Greens re-elected to Council

In a hard-fought election campaign, Greens member Charles Jago has been elected to the City of Canada Bay Council to replace retiring councillor Pauline Tyrrell, who has completed three terms on Council. 

Overall voting trends in the Council area showed a swing away from the Liberals and an increase towards Labor and the Greens. Two groups of Independents also ran in this election and Daniela Ramondino, a local business woman was successful in getting a seat.

The Greens achieved a very small positive swing of 0.75%, with the vote for independents coming from Labor and Liberals. Former Labor mayor, Angelo Tsirekos was re-elected as mayor with three councillors each for Labor and Liberal, with Charles Jago for the Greens and Ms Ramondino holding the final two seats.

Despite an 8% swing against Labor, they were able to re-elect Labor Mayor Angelo Tsirekas and maintain three councillor positions. A 6% swing against the Liberals saw them lose one councillor position, at the expense of previous mayor Helen McCaffrey.

Charles has been an active Greens member for over 15 years and has lived in the City of Canada Bay area since 1989. He currently works as an adult trainer and his professional experience includes working in the information technology and community development sectors.

Charles’s key concerns include:

  • Environmental sustainability, including climate change
  • Planning and development that serves the residents of the Council area
  • Information technology
  • Transport, especially public transport
  • Energy, including demand management and energy efficiency
  • Social justice issues
  • Local democracy to serve local residents.

 

Contact details:
Email:   charles.jago@canadabaygreens.org
Telephone: 0403 902 613

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Candidates for Canada Bay Council election announced

Candidates (l to r): Steve Maxwell, Alysha Hardy, Charles Jago, Pauline Tyrrell and James Okeby.

Candidates (l to r): Steve Maxwell, Alysha Hardy, Charles Jago, Pauline Tyrrell and James Okeby.

Canada Bay Greens are fielding a diverse team of candidates for the upcoming Council elections on 9 September.

Heading the team is Charles Jago who is also running as the Greens mayoral candidate.  He is supported Alysha Hardy, James Okeby, Pauline Tyrrell and Steve Maxwell.

During the 30 years Charles has lived in the Council area, his children were educated locally and competed in local sports teams.  As a long-time Greens member he has been involved in such campaigns as saving the foreshore walk around Concord Hospital, improving public transport services, preserving Cabarita Park and more recently in fighting against forced council mergers.

Reinforcing Charles is three-term Greens councillor Pauline Tyrrell who has championed residents’ rights by promoting the building of a new primary school in Concord West, expanding the bush care program and cleaning up the Parramatta River foreshore. Pauline is retiring as councillor but will still stand on the Canada Bay Greens ticket.

Charles commented, “I am really proud to be following on from Pauline who has done a great job in her twelve years as a councillor.”

Alysha Hardy and James Okeby have first-hand experience of affordable housing issues for young people as well as being passionate about providing more accessible services for elderly and disabled persons in our community.  The final candidate Steve Maxwell is a local resident who represented the Greens in the battle to stop the Clyde Waste-transfer dump in Auburn. Currently retired, his interests lie in supporting the Arts, local Greens campaigns and reviving ‘Speakers corner’ in the Sydney Domain.

As local residents, the Greens team oppose unsustainable residential overdevelopment and support maintaining open spaces and community buildings.  The Greens have consistently opposed any forced merger of Canada Bay with Strathfield and Burwood Councils because surveys have shown that the majority of residents do not want a merger.  Ensuring good public bus services also has a high priority and the Greens will fight to ensure that buses are not privatised, that existing services are not reduced and that local bus routes are improved to better suit residents’ needs.

More information: view the Greens campaign flyer.

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Date set for Canada Bay Council elections

Residents will go to the polls on September 9 to elect nine councillors to represent the community on the City of Canada Bay Council, despite uncertainty over the proposed amalgamation with Strathfield and Burwood Councils.

Under the Local Government Act 1993, Councils where a merger is proposed but have not been amalgamated by April 10 will have an election in September.

If the election proceeds it will have no bearing on the status of the merger proposal, so it is possible for the Council to be amalgamated a short time after the votes are counted.

If the State Government does proceed with its plans to merge the Council the interim the election will not proceed. In such a case, an Administrator will be appointed and election for a new Council will be postponed.

Strathfield Council is still contesting the State Government’s plans to merge it with City of Canada Bay and Burwood Council in Court. It is one of five metropolitan Councils contesting the amalgamation proposals.

Nominations for the Local Government election on 9 September open on July 31 and close on 9 August with pre-polling set to begin on 28 August. For more information about the election visit the Electoral Commission NSW’s website.

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Earthball begins its journey around the State

Greens MP Jeremy Buckingham launched the Earthball on its journey around NSW in Wollongong highlighting how climate change affects our whole planet.  Getting a first-hand introduction to the size of the problem is Charles Jago who will be running in the Canada Bay Council elections to be held on 9 September 2017.earthball cj njb

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Win for first appeal against forced Council mergers

The NSW Court of Appeal has ruled that the process used to support the proposed merger between Ku-ring-gai and Hornsby Councils did not accord with procedural fairness.

At the heart of its challenge was a report by consultancy KPMG, which recommended Council mergers and which the government refused to release in its entirety, claiming it was subject to “public interest immunity”.

Based on KPMG’s analysis and modelling, the Government’s merger proposal stated that “around $70 million in net financial savings over 20 years” would be achieved through the amalgamation of Ku-ring-gai with part of Hornsby Shire.

Judges Robert Macfarlan and John Basten ruled that the delegate appointed to assess the proposed merger could not have properly carried out his assessment without access to the KPMG report.  They also found that the public interest in keeping the report secret was outweighed by the public interest in making the information available.

Judge Basten found that the financial advantages identified by KPMG for the government were a critical element in favour of the merger, but this analysis was not provided to the delegate or public.  As a result, the delegate, Mr West had “constructively failed” in his statutory duty of examining the government’s merger proposal.

“The Council was right to assert that the delegate could not properly carry out his function of examination without having access to that material,” Judge Basten ruled.

“Release of the material was also necessary for public participation in the public inquiry to be meaningful.”

Greens local government spokesman David Shoebridge said: “Today the Court of Appeal has said the obvious, that it is blatantly unfair to forcibly amalgamate a local council on the basis of a secret report.

“This decision doesn’t just affect Ku-ring-gai Council, it could dismantle every single outstanding amalgamation proposal.”

This ruling could affect other Councils opposed to the merger, including Burwood, Canada Bay and Strathfield which have also lodged an appeal in the Supreme Court as well as Hunters Hill, Lane Cove and Ryde; Mosman, North Sydney and Willoughby; and Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra.

Monday’s judgment ordered that Mr West’s report recommending the Council merger be set aside and that any subsequent review by the Boundaries Commission be set aside.

(SMH, 27 March 2017)

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Forced Council merger is likely to go ahead

Following the rejection of the previous Delegate report by the Land & Environment Court, the Delegate has now issued his revised report recommending that the merger of Strathfield, Canada Bay and Burwood Councils proceed.

The report is dated September 2016 but was only made public on 21 December 2016 and gives until 20 January 2017 for any public submissions to be made.

Council made representations to the State Government demanding that such a tight deadline be extended given the Christmas/New Year holiday period to allow sufficient time for Council and any residents to review and respond appropriately to such a significant document. However, the State Government has now declined to extend the deadline.

Residents can review the Delegate’s revised report on the Strathfield Council website at https://dpcsc-ss.s3.amazonaws.com/Uploads/1482211006/Strathfield.pdf.  

If residents wish to make any representations to Council for possible inclusion in Council’s submission, any representations must be sent to submissions@strathfield.nsw.gov.au and received by Council no later than 15 January 2017.

 

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Annual Councillor’s Report

This gallery contains 1 photo.

Pauline Tyrrell, Greens Councillor, City of Canada Bay Council  Here is a summary of my activities over the past year: Environment: I participated in several community events in support of: the Parramatta River Catchment Group’s ‘Make Parramatta River Swimmable’ Campaign; a meeting of Sydney Water with residents; Clean Up Australia Day with CBG members; and Canada Bay Bushcare. I was successful in convincing Council to lobby for more action on … Continue reading

Local council merger stalls after legal challenge

localcouncils

Local council merger stalls after legal challenge

The forced merger between Strathfield, Burwood and Canada Bay councils has been halted in the New South Wales Land and Environment Court as a result of a court challenge by Strathfield council.

The  Court determined that there were legal flaws in the report from the State Government appointed delegate who recommended merging the councils.

A number of other councils including Mosman, Hunters Hill and North Sydney also have challenged the Government’s proposed amalgamations and were buoyed by the result of this challenge.

On 12 May 2016 the State Government created 19 new councils under its forced amalgamation program  which reducing 152 councils to 112 with a delay in respect of the 9 councils that have commenced legal action.

The mergers have resulted in the sacking of hundreds of councillors and the appointment of administrators to administer councils until the next council elections which have been postponed until September 2017.

The first meeting of the new Inner West Council which was the result of the merged Leichhardt, Marrickville and Ashfield councils was marked by a strong resident protest.

Several councils escaped being merged, notably the proposed amalgamation between Walcha and Tamworth council, which was strongly opposed by the Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce.

Other mergers which will not be proceeding include the Hills and Hawkesbury Shire and Kiama and Shoalhaven councils.

 

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Showdown between Community and Coalition on forced council amalgamations

 

Council_Amalgamations_2

The NSW Government’s forced amalgamations plans for local councils have been announced.

The forced amalgamations will cut the number of councils from 152 to 112. In Sydney, 43 councils will be reduced to 25, while 109 regional councils will become 87.

NSW Premier Mike Baird has said the target population size for the proposed merged Sydney councils was 150,000.

State-wide opposition to forced amalgamations has already seen Mike Baird’s merger plans ‘Fit for the Future’ scaled back significantly.  Growing community opposition means that the plans are far from guaranteed.

Greens MP and Local Government Spokesperson David Shoebridge said:

“When a government dribbles out an unpopular policy a week before Christmas it’s a pretty clear sign that it’s feeling a lot of pain and just wants it to stop.

“For all the bluster and arrogance of the Baird government the proposed forced amalgamations on the table today are far less aggressive than his plans were earlier in the year.

“Six months ago the Baird government was planning to have a mass sacking of councils to appoint administrators and force Sydney into just six mega councils with dozens more council mergers in the bush.

“Growing community pressure has already forced a back down from Baird with no councils being sacked and a much reduced plan for forced mergers across the State.

“The Coalition now faces six months of even greater public pressure as each and every one of their proposed forced amalgamations grinds through separate public inquiries run by the Boundaries Commission.

“It’s no surprise this is being announced just before Christmas, it’s is a rubbish policy from an arrogant  government that knows forced amalgamations are deeply unpopular.

“What has been announced today is an incoherent plan for the future of local government without a scrap of evidence to support it.

“There is not a single report that supports a single one of these proposed mergers. What we see from Baird is a scrappy attempt at a political fix and councils and residents deserve far better.

“Baird is already finding that communities have far closer connections with their local councils and the services they provide than some smooth-talking bloke that they see on TV occasionally.

“The Greens remain committed to work with communities to stand up to the Coalition’s bullying, oppose forced amalgamations and keep local councils genuinely local.” Mr Shoebridge said.

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